boston sunday globe

 

Mom and Dad want peace and quiet -- and these designsNo biggie.

Just sharing an article from The Boston Globe where I’m interviewed.

The SUNDAY Globe.

In which I am quoted 3 times.

On the front page article of the “Address” section.

With color photos, and other quotes from folks like the style director for Joss & Main and the editor-in-chief of HGTV Magazine.

Because I’m an EXPERT in designing for families.

Yup. Me and my interior design and organization business. WOOT!!

 

Read it here : “Mom and Dad want peace and quiet — and these designs”

 

 

 

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profile by ‘boston voyager’

Did you catch my interview for Boston Voyager?  I loved having the opportunity to reflect on WHY and HOW I do what I do!  For me, it’s not just about pretty things…

ROI Design, at its core, is about supporting families in their homes, where beauty, stuff, and living well intersect.

Interior designers create beautiful homes that make you feel good. Organizers establish systems for your stuff to help you can stay on top of everything. Child development experts help parents and children understand and communicate with each other. No one else does all of these things.

… My philosophy is not about relegating children’s things to the playroom or their bedrooms, but that the entire home is for the entire family, so how can we incorporate ways for children to learn, play, and grow in every room. Children are always learning, and the ways we allow them to interact with their play things and with our things teaches them something, whether we intend it to or not. I believe in creating spaces that foster their independence and responsibility. And maybe this teaches grown-ups something, too!

Read the whole thing here.

feeling thankful

I asked my family why they like Thanksgiving. Here are their answers:

“I like Thanksgiving because you get to be with your family. And you get to eat.”

“Food.”

“Food and family.”

So there you have it. Thanksgiving is about remembering and appreciating the simple things in life. Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours!

thankful 2017.001

local parenting resources I know & love

I can’t help it. I love babies. Which is why started doing Nesting Consults, to help expecting parents create safe, sleep-friendly, organized, and, yes, pretty spaces for their newborns. But new parents need all kinds of help, more than I can personally provide.

Here are some Boston-area experts I’ve worked with or heard amazing things about. Not in Boston? Most of these experts do consults and workshops online or over the phone.

New Parent Support

JF&CS : Center For Early Relationship Support
consults, new mom support groups, visiting moms programs

Nancy Holtzman
resource for tips, videos, and advice on breastfeeding, sleep, soothing, babywearing, pretty much everything baby

Babywearing International of Greater Boston
babywearing education, lending library of carriers

Boston Baby Nurse
newborn care, night nurse, nanny placement agency

zipmilk.org
directory of lactation support professionals

The Loved Child, Belmont
parent-baby classes, parenting consults, workshops on development topics from birth through adolescence

Little Lovage Club, South End
new mom support groups, parent-baby classes, parenting classes and workshops

Mama & Me, Jamaica Plain
new mom support groups, classes on safety, sleep, infant CPR

Sleep Support

Stewart Family Solutions
consults, classes & workshops on sleep, safety, car seats, infant & child CPR

Baby Sleep Science
sleep consults

Child Development Experts & Enrichment Classes for Parent & Baby

Stewart Family Solutions
consults, classes & workshops on sleep, safety, car seats, infant & child CPR

The Loved Child, Belmont
parent-baby classes, parenting consults, workshops on development topics from birth through adolescence

Little Lovage Club, South End
new mom support groups, parent-baby classes, parenting classes and workshops

The Golden Chickpea Center, Brookline Village
parent-baby/child classes, open play, parties

Galoop, Brookline
parenting consults, parent-baby classes, Spanish immersion classes

 

DISCLAIMER:  ROI Design provides information on this website as a service to our clients and community. We do not license, endorse, or recommend any particular resource, nor are we responsible for the content of or service provided by any of these resources.

 

give me liberty

Liberty London, that is! I’ve always coveted the Britain-based Liberty’s iconic floral prints, and now that they’ve gone and partnered with Anthropologie on a line of very anthro-esque, whimsical-retro, unapologetically sweet home furnishings, a part of me can die happy.

This chair is my absolute favorite. The barrel shape, the mid-century legs, the wood trim, the tufting, and that large-scale English floral — be still my heart 💞

Liberty For Anthropologie Strawberry Thief Bixby Chair

But my husband would flip out if I brought another chair home (I have a thing with chairs, like some people and stray cats), so I might have to just get the Bonnie Bloom duvet cover. And the sheets, too, because you gotta go big or go home when it comes to Liberty London.

Liberty for Anthropologie Bonnie Bloom Sheet Set

The entire collection, which includes more upholstery, other bedding patterns, tableware, notebooks, aprons, and this darling table and bentwood chairs, is available online here. If I don’t snap everything up first.

libertyanthrotamsin

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Shop the Liberty For Anthropologie Strawberry Thief Bixby Chair and more Anthropologie at Anthropologie today. Read customer reviews, discover product details and more.

Source: Liberty For Anthropologie Strawberry Thief Bixby Chair | Anthropologie

the ultimate decluttering secret

I need to get something off my chest. I’ve been taking advantage of people who ask me for organizing help. I have discovered the answer to society’s clutter epidemic but haven’t told anyone until now.

In helping families declutter and get organized over the past few years, I’ve observed a common thread that connects them. I have to conclude that it is the cause of all the clutter problems.

It’s Amazon.

Okay, so it’s not always exactly Amazon. It’s Overstock, eBay, Peapod, Everlane, or other website du jour, but it IS online shopping. More specifically, it is the “Amazonized” attitude towards shopping that values convenience, quickness, and getting a good deal.

I’m not talking about procurement, margins, and what happens at Amazon-the-business — that’s not my gig. My concern is that the ease of shopping online is causing an epidemic of cluttered, disorganized homes, leading to unhappy families.

Every time I visit a client for an organizing session, I see boxes in the entry waiting to be unpacked. People are paying me to get rid of stuff, but they just bought more stuff.

WHAT??!?

cluttered entryway

We no longer need to take time out of our busy schedules to physically go shopping. Nor do we need to exert ourselves lugging our purchases home on the subway or into and out of the car. We feel we’re being responsible by restocking before we run out of something. And we’re obviously getting the best prices on everything because of our promo codes and cash back and the streamlined supply chain an online retailer is able to achieve. We don’t even need to open our wallets.

In a single click, or just a tap on a mobile device, purchases are magically en route, in some cases, arriving within hours. We come home from work, juggling laptops and toddlers, texting our partners about what to order for dinner, to find humongous brown boxes smiling at us from our doorsteps, boxes that contain 60 rolls of Charmin, a brick of AAA batteries, a case of Goldfish crackers, and a collector’s edition officially-licensed replica Kylo Ren mask because it was the Deal of the Day.

amazon box

Don’t pretend this doesn’t happen to you. A similar humongous box arrives at least — AT LEAST — twice a week. Since we’re ordering one item, might as well get another if it all comes in one box. How often do we order a new something because we aren’t sure where our something is (hello, charging cables!)? If spending another $17 gets us free shipping, doing so becomes a moral imperative. Twice a week, non-essential impulse items come into our homes along with well-intentioned orders of Swiffer cloths. That’s 104 humongous, smiling boxes a year.

Let’s not forget about the oh-so-handy monthly subscription services that send us maker kits for our elementary schoolers’ enrichment, eco-friendly toys and treats for our beloved and deserving pets, diapers in the size our baby just outgrew, and organic healthy snacks from around the world for the whole family.

The packaging alone is more clutter than one person can handle. If we don’t have time to go to the store, we don’t have time to unbox and put all this crap away. Especially if it entails going through the crap you got last week to make room for the new crap.

Enter baskets, boxes, bins, and organizational problem solvers. We can’t find space to put all our stuff, so we throw money at the problem. Custom closets, Elfa systems, attractive woven baskets, clear stacking boxes with lids, super-slim hangers, label makers… and yes, professional organizers.

I am embarrassed to admit it, but I really ought to tell clients who hire me for organization to STOP SHOPPING ONLINE.

I should just say :

Make a list of what you need. Go to Target and look at how much space 60 rolls of toilet paper takes up. Compare that to the size of the space you have to store toilet paper, and you’ll buy 12 rolls. Bring the kids and see if you have 90 seconds to look at Star Wars collectibles before someone has to pee, and you won’t buy Star Wars anything. Walk around with Goldfish in your cart but swap them for fresh grapes because you realize your cart is full of salty carbs. After a few months of this, you also won’t buy a brick of AAA batteries because you won’t have bought more battery-operated Deals of the Day that you never needed in the first place. You’ll also cancel the automatic subscription once you see that you already have 4 sealed bottles of plant-based, cruelty-free cleaning products.

True story.

honest

There is mindfulness to be discovered in planning a shopping trip. Taking inventory of the consumables in your home will help you plan meals and save money by not ordering take-out. The life-changing magic of making a list of the things you need and buying them will mean you can stop reading books about what sparks joy.

And please, bring your kids to the store with you. I agree that shopping with kids is one of life’s most trying experiences. Bring a friend if you’re scared — I’d go with you.

Like all life skills, if our kids don’t see us do it, they won’t learn how.